April season now on sale

For April the Errol Flynn Filmhouse continues to present the best new releases, including Woman in Gold, starring Helen Mirren as a Jewish wartime survivor, and the uplifting new British drama X+Y about a young maths prodigy. The pick of world cinema includes, from Argentina, the Oscar-nominated black comedy Wild Tales and Swedish romance Something Must Break. Dancing in Jaffa heads up a fascinating selection of documentaries, while a highlight of the classic film selection is Ridley Scott’s iconic Blade Runner: The Final Cut. There are more live broadcasts to look forward to from the National Theatre, Bolshoi Ballet and Metropolitan Opera, along with a chance to get a close up look at Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum.

One of the highlights of the Under The Radar selection of independent films is the new British drama X+Y, starring Sally Hawkins and Rafe Spall, telling the story of a socially awkward teenager, played by Asa Butterfield, who finds new confidence and new friendships when he lands a spot on the British squad at the International Mathematics Olympiad. Tense British thriller Catch Me Daddy follows a young Pakistani girl who runs away with her white boyfriend to West Yorkshire, pursued by her brother and a gang of thugs. Crime drama Hyena sees a violent and corrupt policeman find his job getting tougher as an influx of Albanian gangsters threatens to change London’s criminal landscape. Laurence Fishburne stars in sci-fi thriller The Signal, which follows a group of students abducted while tracking down a hacker, only to awake in a living nightmare. BAFTA Shorts brings a feature-length selection of short live-action and animated films from this year’s BAFTA Awards, including Best Short Film winner Boogaloo and Graham, and a film by Northamptonshire film-maker Oscar Sharp, The Karman Line, featuring Olivia Colman.

A highlight of the great selection of films from around the world includes Wild Tales, a collection of six dark, scary and deliciously scabrous stories, in Spanish with English subtitles. From Denmark, Suzanne Bier’s startling yet moving drama A Second Chance, about a detective pushed to his limits, explores how easily someone can lose their grasp on justice when confronted with the unthinkable. April’s Q-Film screening is the Swedish film Something Must Break, the story of a passionate love between Sebastian, who wants to be a woman, and the heterosexual Andreas, and one of the BFI’s top five must-see LGBT films from the 2015 London Film Festival. The latest Oscar-nominated animation from Japan’s Studio Ghibli is The Tale of Princess Kaguya, based on the legend of a tiny girl who sprouts from a bamboo shoot and rapidly grows into the most beautiful young woman in the land.

Among the pick of the latest big releases coming to the Errol Flynn Filmhouse is Woman in Gold, starring Helen Mirren in the remarkable true story of Maria Altman, an elderly Jewish survivor of the Second World War seeking to retrieve a beloved Klimt painting stolen from her family by the Nazis. White Bird in a Blizzard stars Shailene Woodley as a teenage girl whose world is turned upside down when her mother mysteriously disappears. Noah Boaumbach’s latest comedy, While We’re Young, features Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts as a childless New York couple in their forties whose lives are changed when they befriend a disarming young couple of hipsters, Amanda Seyfried and Adam Driver. In the gentle comedy Still Life, Eddie Marson plays a shy council worker who writes eulogies and organises funerals for those who have died alone, and finds himself drawn to one such man’s long-lost daughter, played by Downton Abbey’s Joanne Froggatt. The delicious lo-fi horror movie It Follows tells the tale of a teenager who, after a sexual encounter, finds herself haunted by nightmarish visions and the inescapable sense that something is after her. Ideal for family outings over the Easter weekend, Disney’s Oscar-nominated animated adventure Big Hero 6 follows a young robotics prodigy called Hiro who forms a close bond with inflatable robot Baymax, and with the cinema’s special Easter Family Ticket Offer one adult and one child can enjoy this film for just £11.

Looking ahead to May, tickets are already on sale for the delightful period drama, A Little Chaos, in which Alan Rickman directs Kate Winslet as a strong-willed landscape gardener chosen to work at King Louis XIV’s new palace at Versailles.

There is a further chance to see some audience favourites from recent months including the popular and colourful sequel, The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, starring Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Bill Nighy, Richard Gere and Tamsin Greig, and the historical drama Selma with David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King. Eddie Redmayne gives an Oscar-winning performance as Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything, as does Julianne Moore in Still Alice, as a renowned linguistics professor diagnosed with early on-set Alzheimers. Clint Eastwood directs Bradley Cooper as Chris Kyle, the most lethal sniper in US military history, in the much-nominated American Sniper.

April’s programme of classic films starts with John Schlesinger’s 1967 screen adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd, starring Julie Christie and Terence Stamp. Harrison Ford stars as a world-weary detective hunting down a group of murderous replicants led by Rutger Hauer in the 1982 sci-fi thriller Blade Runner: The Final Cut, inspired by Philip K Dick’s iconic novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. From 1992, there is also the chance to see Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, David Lynch’s dark and disturbing prequel to his TV saga, starring Sheryl Lee, Kyle McLachlan and Chris Isaac. This month’s Cult Film Club screening, programmed in partnership with The University of Northampton, is the stylish 1973 horror comedy, Theatre of Blood, starring Vincent Price as a hammy actor finally getting revenge on his detractors with a series of executions inspired by the Bard’s works.

A fascinating selection of documentaries includes the uplifting Dancing in Jaffa, following internationally renowned ballroom dancing champion Pierre Dulaine as he teaches Palestinian-Israeli and Jewish-Israeli children to dance and compete together. Dior and I gives a privileged, behind-the-scenes look at the creation of Raf Simons’ first haute couture collection as iconic Christian Dior brand’s new Artistic Director. In Nobody Told Us Anything, BAFTA-winning filmmaker Charles Stewart tackles the shocking story of the 20,000 service personnel who were exposed to the previously unknown effects of nuclear radiation between 1952 and 1962. The director will be at the Errol Flynn Filmhouse for a Q&A after the screening.

Live screenings for the coming month include NT Live’s The Hard Problem, Tom Stoppard’s highly anticipated new play, directed by Nicholas Hytner and broadcast live from the National Theatre in London. The Bolshoi Ballet’s Ivan the Terrible, featuring music composed by Prokofiev for the 1944 Eisenstein film, is screened live from Moscow, while the Met Opera Live season presents opera’s most enduring double bill, Cavalleria Rusticana and Pagliacci, in an evocative new production coming live from New York. There is also another chance to see the RSC’s Love’s Labour’s Won, recorded recently in Stratford-upon-Avon. Other special events include Exhibition on Screen: Vincent Van Gogh, giving complete and unprecedented access to the treasures of Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum as the collection enjoys a major re-showing to mark the 125th anniversary of the artist’s death.

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